The role of the prefrontal cortex in social orientation construction: A pilot study

The role of the prefrontal cortex in social orientation construction: A pilot study

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The restoring and maximising of well-being in individuals disadvantaged or traumatised by physical, neurological, psychological or social causes therefore becomes a significant issue for all professionals whether in life, social or information sciences. This poster presents a review of the literature to establish a prima facie case for investigating the role of the prefrontal cortex in predetermining outcomes of the with medicalised social orientation impairments such as autism, Bipolar, Schizophrenia, ADHD, as well as problems relating to occupation health and substance misuse. The characteristics of the pre-frontal cortex are identified from a number of journals and then these terms cross references with those impairments. Anseries of equations are presented on how one might look at representing differences in the pre-frontal cortex by using a post-cognitivist psychology paradigm to represent the psycho-analytical concepts of ‘phantasies’ in a manner that allows for use in questionnaire, statistical analysis, and information system adaptation.

Full Text

The role of the prefrontal cortex in social orientation construction: A pilot study

Summary of Conclusions

  • It is emotional dysfunction in the brain that causes most people to be autistic and not them having ‘autism’
  • Someone becomes autistic through a sub-optimal prefrontal cortex which affects working memory, among other factors.
  • A prefrontal cortex can become sub-optimal through lack of brain function to handle social and emotional stressors, such as might be caused by brain injuries such as hippocampal sclerosis
  • It can also become sub-optimal through traumatic abuse, including allergic reactions to vaccines, sex abuse, traumatic birth.
  • Finally, a sub-optimal pre-frontal cortex can come about through genetic mutations in it.
  • The degree of impairment in the prefrontal cortex can be measured through simple alpha and beta brain imaging tools

References

Bishop, J. (2011). The role of the prefrontal cortex in social orientation construction: A pilot study. Poster presented to the British Psychological Society’s Sustainable Well-Being Conference. Glyndwr University, Wrexham, 10 September 2011. Available online at: http://www.jonathanbishop.com/Library/Documents/EN/docBPSSWPoster.pdf

0 thoughts on “The role of the prefrontal cortex in social orientation construction: A pilot study”

  1. Thank you for submitting your manuscript to Nature Neuroscience. After careful consideration, however, we have regretfully concluded that this paper is not suitable for publication in our journal.

    Manuscripts submitted to Nature Neuroscience are evaluated by the editorial staff for their potential general interest before a decision is made as to whether they should be sent out for peer review. Your manuscript is too specialized and likely to be of limited appeal to those outside the immediate field.

    While we are in no way questioning the validity of your work or its interest to others in the field, I am afraid we are not persuaded that the novel conclusions in this work justify publication in Nature Neuroscience rather than a more specialized journal.

    1. Only the best people fail Steve as they are the ones always taking risks and always pushing themselves to the limit – myself included. Name me one successful person who has never failed. Would you have said the same to William Edwards with his many unsuccessful attempts at the single-span bridge? I think you’d be more of a Robert Obtuse as opposed to a Robert the Bruce if so!

  2. I would suggest you start by writing papers which review a study by reputable professional psychology academic rather than diving in and developing your own proposals – you really don’t have the academic cache at present to be attractive to research journals of decent research rating or peer review on this subject

    Very interesting reading though – perhaps be a little careful with quoting Vygotsky like that though as his views are a little controversial in some areas.

    1. Giboff,

      You are about five years behind my academic career. In 2005 I proposed the Ecological Cognition Framework at a conference in Glasgow, in this speech, which was well received.

      In 2007 I used it to critique Maslow in this paper, and also behaviourism and cognitivism in this paper. So I have been there and done that, and nearly all my work since has been based on the ECF, including this poster!

      You say: “you really don’t have the academic cache at present to be attractive to research journals of decent research rating or peer review on this subject”
      Of course not, I did not have this paper published, nor did I this chapter.

  3. I think the point Steve is trying to make is that he finds it especially pleasing to see you fail.

    Perhaps a little harsh, but I can see why a reputable journal may turn down your article as it makes sense to an extent, but it can’t be said to really add to the knowledge of the area

    1. Steve could get a lot of pleasure out of my life then, as like my ancestors risk taking is in my blood so there are a lot of failures among the many successes – Nothing ventured nothing gained.

      In the two county elections I stood in but “failed” to win I was happy with the result. To have beaten the Plaid Cymru candidate in both elections and for the public to have put so much faith in me to get that result is very satisfying. Equally, last year I was nominated to be Mayor of Pontypridd and got the support of most of the minority parties’ members. Having their confidence was humbling, even though I didn’t win. This mindset I have, is what other successful people have also.

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