Where the true credit lies

Jonathan believes that politicians should recognise the efforts of those who work for them

It was good to read that Rhondda Cynon Taf Council has been highly commended in an awards ceremony (“Borough Council in top league”, March 18).

However, this is more to do with the hard work of council employees than any so-called leadership from the nationalists.

Pauline Jarman and her deputy, Jonathan Huish, have shown nothing that could be considered good leadership since they came top power and have done little to improve people’s

Despite receiving massive increases in funding from the National Assembly, Plaid Cymru have done hardly anything to improve Pontypridd and the surrounding area ‐ and they call this leadership.
In Cardiff, the city centre has radically changed under a Labour leadership, with many new shops opening, and there is a feeling of optimism among local people as Cardiff approaches its centenary in 2005.
Only a Labour‐controlled local authority could deliver the changes people dreamof ‐ changes that will make our communities stronger and safer.

On path of destruction

Jonathan believes that local government has a responsibility to ensure it does all it can to provide for the community it represents.

People may rightly wonder where their council tax is going. It’s certainly not being spent on maintaining the parks and footpaths that Rhondda Cynon Taf Council are responsible for.

Since Plaid Cymru came to power, borough walkers, and those in Llantwit Fardre in particular, have had to put up with impassable footpaths, unsafe walkways and the loss of many of our roadside seats.

Instead of approving plans to destroy our parks, this council should be developing sustainable policies so present and future generations can enjoy the result of a balanced ecology.

Educating young people about Europe through E-Learning

Hannah Blythyn, the UK’s representative on the Young European Socialists panel Ecosy, said that we need to look at “ways of engaging young people in the idea of Europe, citizenship and the political processes and activities” and must “fight all forms of social exclusion and work in solidarity towards a Europe of equality and social justice.”

As I wrote in a previous post I believe that e-learning can deliver social justice and
create equality, and I believe it can also be used to educate people about Europe.
When I developed PARLE three years ago, I saw the potential of e-learning for
creating equality and including those least included in society in social activities
that they normally find difficult. This year I have developed an e-learning system
called LOIS, which educates people on how to negotiate EU by simulating the
negotiation process known as social dialogue.

Whilst I have not evaluated LOIS yet, it could be used to educate young people
about how EU Social Policy is made through allowing them to take part in
negotiations representing specific social partners, such as ETUC and UNICE and
take part in shaping legislative proposals that the social partners and EU legislative
institutions would discuss.