New blood for Labour branch

Getting young people into politics has really been taken to heart by Treforest Labour Party, with three youth members becoming officers and taking over major roles.

Nineteen-year-old Mark Beech, of Meadow Street, has become chair, Gemma Bennett, aged 21, of Queen Street, has become deputy chair and Jonathan Bishop, aged 25, of Cliff Terrace, has become secretary.

The team is completed with long-term resident Nora Ashman, of New Park Terrace, taking the important role of treasurer.

Secretary Jonathan Bishop said the role of the officers is to now build links with the community.
“There are many issues in Treforest that need addressing,” he said.
“But with a growing membership of small business owners, students and residents we are in a strong position to present to the Labour council what the community of Treforest wants to see happen.”

Parking petition has more names

Jonathan would like to thank those who have signed his petition so far and encourage more to sign it.

On the weekend of the Tom Jones concert in Ynysangharad War Memorial Park, me and a supporter of my campaign were handing out leaflets to encourage people to sign my petition to save the park from developers.

I’ve had a significant response to the campaign and now have 17 per cent of the signatures needed to send the petition to the Prime Minister for his response.

Some of the people I spoke to said they were not sure whether to sign it because they wanted movement on the redevelopment of the town, and another who
contributed to my website asked why we should wait another 10 years for
regeneration.
We do not need to have parking in the park to have pedestrianisation of Taff Street
and easier access to the shops for wheelchair users.
We do not need a huge supermarket that will force smaller stores to close, in order
to get a modern shopping centre.
The park is important to the ecology of Pontypridd, an asset that should be
protected.
I urge people to sign my e‐petition at http://www.jonathanbishop.org.uk/savepontypark, so that I
can get a response from the Prime Minister on the issue.

Taxing the Motorist: Is it fair?

Jonathan believes that the government should not tax people so much that they can barely afford to live

The Sun reported today that soon motorists could end up paying for using British roads by having a satellite track their usage of the roads and charging them a fixed fee per kilometre of road that they use.

It seems wrong to me that people should be taxed to own a car, taxed via council tax to pay for the local roads, and then taxed again through this new system. If the government are going to introduce the system as The Sun describes it, they should
at least abolish car tax and abolish council tax.
You can tell when Mark is not debating with me and is debating with Lio instead; he comes
up with the most impractical of policies. Following on from The Sun’s story, he suggests charging motorists higher fuel charges. Such a
policy would hit poorest people the most, people who are already struggling to pay
to tax and insure their car.
I can’t really say what the best policy would be, being someone who does not own
a car and relies on public transport, but I think the government needs to radically
think its taxation policy in all areas, so that people pay an amount of tax that is fair,
and not be taxed so extensively that they can barely afford to live and enjoy their
lives.
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