An investigation into how the European Union affects the development and provision of e-learning services

This dissertation focuses on the main aspects of EU law affecting the e-learning industry and of particular interest to Jonathan were competition law and intellectual property law, including copyright and third-party intellectual property rights (TPIP) issues.

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Cite as: Bishop, J. (2007). An investigation into how the European Union affects the development and provision of e-learning services. LLM Thesis. Pontypridd, UK: University of Glamorgan.

Construction worker has sights set on Europe

Not content to let office debates on the role of the EU in producing mountains of legislation for his company, one Ogmore employee has risen to the challenged by completing a Masters in European Union Law to assist his managers.

Jonathan Bishop, 27, who has worked at Llanharry-based Four-Sure Construction Ltd since 2004 says his LLM course has been an eye-opener into how the EU functions as a legislative and enforcement body, “I went into this course knowing that the EU contributes much of the UK’s law, but I didn’t realise how much the UK Government has to take account of EU treaties when making law until I had studied the key primary and secondary legislation as part of the course and my dissertation into EU e-learning law.”

Local MP for Ogmore Huw Irranca-Davies congratulated Jonathan on achieving his second Masters and believes like Jonathan the Wales and Britain are best served by being in the EU, “Britain is clearly better off in Europe, and that is not only because of our ability to access to the world’s largest single market, with a population that is now more than 450 million, but because we benefit from receiving the lion’s share of foreign investment.”
“It is time to move on and discover the new vision – the dream that will engage the youth and others in the European project.”

Jonathan says he will now look at his options from further progression in his workplace to becoming an elected representative, “For a long time I have wanted to represent my community at the highest level and thanks to Four-Sure I now have the knowledge base for a position in European Affairs in the UK or on the continent”

Increasing participation in online communities: A framework for human-computer interaction

Citation

Bishop, J. (2007). Increasing participation in online communities: A framework for human-computer interaction. Computers in Human Behavior, 23(4), 1881-1893.

Abstract

Online communities are becoming an accepted part of the lives of Internet users, although participation in these communities is dependent on the types of people that form them. Some of the online community’s members do not participate, people referred to as lurkers, whereas others who have been in the community for a long time, referred to as elders, participate regularly and support others. Understanding what drives these individuals and how they chose whether or not to participate will lead to online communities that thrive. This paper proposes a conceptual framework to describe what drives such individuals to carry out actions such as posting messages and adding content (level 1), the cognitions they use to determine whether or not to take such actions (level 2) and the means by which they go about carrying out the action in the environment (level 3). Finally, the framework is applied to the problem of encouraging members to participate by discussing the methods by which people can be persuaded to participate by changing the way they interpret their desires and their environment.

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Increasing participation in online communities: A framework for human-computer interaction

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Awards

This seminal paper above has received the following accolades:

  • Rated as one of the Top 8 Posts about Online Communities by FeverBee – The Online Community Guide.
  • Ranked as one of the Top 25 Hottest Computer Science articles of 2007.
  • Ranked as one of the Top 20 most cited papers of all time in Computers in Human Behaviour.